Anonymous man takes a Militant Stance against the Disease Concept

The following post is a comment we received on an article entitled “Moderate Drinking Harms Your Brains.” This man took a very strong stance against the idea of addiction being a disease. I thought the only fair thing to do is to publish it and see what you guys think. Have at it…
It’s a shame really that none of these “professionals” have actually responded to your post. I read it & was saddened. I still can’t believe that somebody could actually read that & right after that, hop on onto opening a new web-browser tab, in complete ignorance of your situation; without even a shred of tenderness. Well, I couldn’t. Unfortunately, am not much of a professional either. What would a Medical student barely done with his first year of study surely offer? Nothing much, but as I said earlier, I couldn’t ignore your post so I’ll try and give it my best shot. But don’t by this because addiction is a phenomenon that many have died trying to make sense of it to no avail. The crème de la crème of brains within the societies, the doctors, can barely figure out whether addiction is a disease or a choice. It’s that bad! (No wonder they ignored your post)

I spent my holiday researching on drug addiction, mainly from secondary sources. And I’ll share with you the little knowledge that I’ve gained, with the specific drug in mind being “alcohol”. Am training to be a medical doctor, so as a hard a concept as addiction maybe, I’ll take up the responsibility and tackle it from this point of view: addiction as a disease & not a choice. Many will disagree with me. “But addiction is a choice! You’ve been told to say NO to drugs but you went on ahead and said YES! It’s not like cancer, diabetes where you cannot exercise your constitutional freedom of choice” (this statement assumes that your country exercises this). Well, I won’t argue with this. Addiction as I said earlier has baffled many.

So, from my point of view, addiction as a disease. Addiction, like any other disease, involves a defect in a particular organ of the body. Unfortunately, when it comes to addiction, it is the most complex organ of them all that is being affected; the brain. Doctors may know everything about the liver, the kidneys but trust me, they only know a fraction of the brain. Consequently, crippling doctor’s efforts of treating this very curable disease of the brain: addiction. I’ll explain the little science behind it (the one they’ve been able to figure out so far) in the simplest manner possible. You’ve probably heard of the brain’s reward/pleasure system. When activated, this system reinforces behavior. For example: in the case of a drug addiction, the drug stimulates the brain to receive a reward, in this case a feeling of being high. A bit of more science: Addictive drugs causes a massive release of neurotransmitters (which bring about the sensation of pleasure) in the brain. This feeling of pleasure brings about a habit, a desire in fact, of doing that particular act that brings about that “on top of the world” sensation. The body on the other hand, being highly organized & demanding to always be in a state of balance, will down-regulate the number of receptors for this increased number of neurotransmitters. As a result, an even higher dosage of the drug will be required in order to acquire the pleasurable sensation. Result=addiction! The brain becomes heavily dependent on the drug to be able to experience simple sensations of pleasure. Therefore, on quitting the drug, the brain is no longer sensitive to the neurotransmitters involved in the various aspects of mood. This is where withdrawals set in: depression, anxiety, tremors etc. So simply put, “addiction messes with the biochemicals of the brain” it’s not as simple as a case of prom night poor decision-making. It even gets more complicated, as more and more chemicals are being identified as being involved. So treatment to this disease, unlike most others involves the hard and a lot of support, because again, it’s the brain here we’re talking about. Trying to convince the brain the perceiving, in this case, alcohol as a must for survival.

Recovery: Again I insist, you’ll need assistance. Be it medical assistance, support groups, psychotherapy because this is unlike all other diseases. This is a disease that has the brain on its side & mind you, the brain controls the rest of the body. So you may just be on your way to a rehabilitation center, after you’ve decided to put alcohol behind you only for the brain now in cohorts with the disease (for the first time ever), to walk you straight into a bar. Am a huge fan of the TV show The Vampire Diaries (am not sure the case is similar): Klaus, a hybrid vampire-werewolf, relieves werewolves of the pain of having to turn every full moon by making the like him and consequently, they become “sired” to him. Almost like alcohol, an addict is sired to it cause of its calming effect as a sedative. Takes away the withdrawals. Well, the show goes on and for a werewolf to break their “sire bondage” to Klaus, they have to experience the full pain package of turning into a werewolf (the very pain they had been alleviated from by turning into hybrids). And sadly so, to break the addiction, you’ve to experience the pain of the full moon. That’s why I say you’ll need plenty of help. With no more exposure to drugs and alcohol, the part of the brain involved in pleasure, motivation and relaxation slowly returns to normal. And as more and more doctors view this as a disease, more and more of them have come up with drugs that abet in quitting alcoholism. Some act by improving the brains sensitivity to the neuro transmitters, some mitigate the withdrawal symptoms. A good example is the drug paraxil that you tried using. Others include: GLA supplementation. All this though should be under the doctor’s prescription. Recovery and rehabilitation has become easier as more and more doctors view addiction as a diseases and hopefully more and more drugs will be formulated to combat this.

You now know what you have to do if you really want to leave alcoholism behind. You’ve complained of how you wish your be reminded of how alcoholism has left your life even more miserable right before you’re about to have a sip of that drink. Well, here’s me reminding you: nothing will change if you remain there hooked. The next 8 years will be as sh*tty as the last 8 (that is assuming liver cirrhosis will have pitied you for that long). Decide! Get help. Trust me, there are rehabilitation centers out there not out for your money which could actually. And as ive told, with doctors figuring out the science behind addiction and slowly coming up with medication, recovery has been made easier. I wish I was old enough and rich enough to have one you’ll have been admitted for free and done everything to help you. Decide to LIVE the next 8 years. Fall in love even!

I’ve barely slept writing this, I sure do hope it helps (sorry, barely had time to proof-read). Opening up about your situation was extraordinary. Many will learn from this. Give back to the society, share with them what you’ve been through so that they can learn. I also do hope this post helps somebody out there. Blessings, fortune & favor.

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Comments

  1. Eddie deRoulet says

    he should stay in school and learn to write as i failed to understand most of what he was trying to say.

  2. Eddie deRoulet says

    he should stay in school and learn to write as i failed to understand most of what he was trying to say.

  3. Eddie deRoulet says

    he should stay in school and learn to write as i failed to understand most of what he was trying to say.

  4. Eddie deRoulet says

    he should stay in school and learn to write as i failed to understand most of what he was trying to say.

  5. Johnnie Smith says

    Militant really, didn’t see that at all. Nevertheless that information is already known. I could go on and on and say what’s really goin on but the long and the short is most of the only avenues in place after the treatment is done are operating at a, I’ll be generous, with a 92% failure rate.. Then to hear it touted as a success.

  6. Johnnie Smith says

    Militant really, didn’t see that at all. Nevertheless that information is already known. I could go on and on and say what’s really goin on but the long and the short is most of the only avenues in place after the treatment is done are operating at a, I’ll be generous, with a 92% failure rate.. Then to hear it touted as a success.

  7. Johnnie Smith says

    Militant really, didn’t see that at all. Nevertheless that information is already known. I could go on and on and say what’s really goin on but the long and the short is most of the only avenues in place after the treatment is done are operating at a, I’ll be generous, with a 92% failure rate.. Then to hear it touted as a success.

  8. Johnnie Smith says

    Militant really, didn’t see that at all. Nevertheless that information is already known. I could go on and on and say what’s really goin on but the long and the short is most of the only avenues in place after the treatment is done are operating at a, I’ll be generous, with a 92% failure rate.. Then to hear it touted as a success.

  9. Hilary Rediker, MA, Addiction Counselor says

    Once he starts practicing medicine, he’ll understand a lot better. THose are just the words of an idealistic student. Sometimes they feel overly encouraged to instigate debate.

  10. Hilary Rediker, MA, Addiction Counselor says

    Once he starts practicing medicine, he’ll understand a lot better. THose are just the words of an idealistic student. Sometimes they feel overly encouraged to instigate debate.

  11. Hilary Rediker, MA, Addiction Counselor says

    Once he starts practicing medicine, he’ll understand a lot better. THose are just the words of an idealistic student. Sometimes they feel overly encouraged to instigate debate.

  12. Hilary Rediker, MA, Addiction Counselor says

    Once he starts practicing medicine, he’ll understand a lot better. THose are just the words of an idealistic student. Sometimes they feel overly encouraged to instigate debate.

  13. Ken says

    He makes a great intellectual argument, I used to think its was a choice and not a disease, until I learned it is an alergy, an abnormal reaction to a substance, alcohol, an illness, as defined in the dictionary a disease. What he does not explain is why the dopamine levels return after sobriety, because all alcoholics do not have low levels, they are suppressed from the substitute of excessive drinking. Dr. Henri Begleiter’s COGA studies showed a defiency in P1 but did not prove a absolute predisposition. That does not mean genetics are not a factor. The writers position that alcoholics have “free choice” to drink is also not answered entirely by environment and refer more to philosophy than science. The phenomenon of craving is not cured as a result of sobriety even when the brains dopamine levels return, or through the uses of activators. I came to believe that it is a disease when I understood that it is a disease of behavior. A mental defect such as other mental and psychological disorders. I have found that in nearly every instance the alcoholic’s disease is that of a deeper behavioral issue than that of addiction &/or alcohol.

  14. Ken says

    He makes a great intellectual argument, I used to think its was a choice and not a disease, until I learned it is an alergy, an abnormal reaction to a substance, alcohol, an illness, as defined in the dictionary a disease. What he does not explain is why the dopamine levels return after sobriety, because all alcoholics do not have low levels, they are suppressed from the substitute of excessive drinking. Dr. Henri Begleiter’s COGA studies showed a defiency in P1 but did not prove a absolute predisposition. That does not mean genetics are not a factor. The writers position that alcoholics have “free choice” to drink is also not answered entirely by environment and refer more to philosophy than science. The phenomenon of craving is not cured as a result of sobriety even when the brains dopamine levels return, or through the uses of activators. I came to believe that it is a disease when I understood that it is a disease of behavior. A mental defect such as other mental and psychological disorders. I have found that in nearly every instance the alcoholic’s disease is that of a deeper behavioral issue than that of addiction &/or alcohol.

  15. Ken says

    He makes a great intellectual argument, I used to think its was a choice and not a disease, until I learned it is an alergy, an abnormal reaction to a substance, alcohol, an illness, as defined in the dictionary a disease. What he does not explain is why the dopamine levels return after sobriety, because all alcoholics do not have low levels, they are suppressed from the substitute of excessive drinking. Dr. Henri Begleiter’s COGA studies showed a defiency in P1 but did not prove a absolute predisposition. That does not mean genetics are not a factor. The writers position that alcoholics have “free choice” to drink is also not answered entirely by environment and refer more to philosophy than science. The phenomenon of craving is not cured as a result of sobriety even when the brains dopamine levels return, or through the uses of activators. I came to believe that it is a disease when I understood that it is a disease of behavior. A mental defect such as other mental and psychological disorders. I have found that in nearly every instance the alcoholic’s disease is that of a deeper behavioral issue than that of addiction &/or alcohol.

  16. Ken says

    He makes a great intellectual argument, I used to think its was a choice and not a disease, until I learned it is an alergy, an abnormal reaction to a substance, alcohol, an illness, as defined in the dictionary a disease. What he does not explain is why the dopamine levels return after sobriety, because all alcoholics do not have low levels, they are suppressed from the substitute of excessive drinking. Dr. Henri Begleiter’s COGA studies showed a defiency in P1 but did not prove a absolute predisposition. That does not mean genetics are not a factor. The writers position that alcoholics have “free choice” to drink is also not answered entirely by environment and refer more to philosophy than science. The phenomenon of craving is not cured as a result of sobriety even when the brains dopamine levels return, or through the uses of activators. I came to believe that it is a disease when I understood that it is a disease of behavior. A mental defect such as other mental and psychological disorders. I have found that in nearly every instance the alcoholic’s disease is that of a deeper behavioral issue than that of addiction &/or alcohol.

  17. LaPortaMA says

    >If it’s not a dis-ease, why is he uncomfortable with it?
    >After 20+ years in medicine, I realized that most “healthcare” misses entire dimensions.
    Blessed are those who hunger and thirst.

  18. LaPortaMA says

    >If it’s not a dis-ease, why is he uncomfortable with it?
    >After 20+ years in medicine, I realized that most “healthcare” misses entire dimensions.
    Blessed are those who hunger and thirst.

  19. Chris says

    The most important thing he wrote here, besides the obvious was that once addicts are sober, meaning free of all substances, which is rare, most addicts go from their substance of choice to weed, alcohol, etc… but are rarely free of all substances, which is why they never give their brains a chance to go back to where they once were before the addiction. That’s what is really sad, and that’s where the choice certainly does come in.

  20. Chris says

    The most important thing he wrote here, besides the obvious was that once addicts are sober, meaning free of all substances, which is rare, most addicts go from their substance of choice to weed, alcohol, etc… but are rarely free of all substances, which is why they never give their brains a chance to go back to where they once were before the addiction. That’s what is really sad, and that’s where the choice certainly does come in.

  21. Jenois67 says

    As a molecular biologist, I totally agree. Being fat is not a disease, being a smoker is not a disease: Its a genetic predisposition!!! every time a fat person or a smoker reaches for junk food or a cigarette, they make a choice, choice becomes habit, the bodies biochemistry changes, more receptors are created, which reinforce the habit and so the feed back cycle continues. fat people and smokers are not considered diseased. Why then are we supposed to feel sorry for, make allowances for and pity alcoholics and drug dependent people???

  22. Jenois67 says

    As a molecular biologist, I totally agree. Being fat is not a disease, being a smoker is not a disease: Its a genetic predisposition!!! every time a fat person or a smoker reaches for junk food or a cigarette, they make a choice, choice becomes habit, the bodies biochemistry changes, more receptors are created, which reinforce the habit and so the feed back cycle continues. fat people and smokers are not considered diseased. Why then are we supposed to feel sorry for, make allowances for and pity alcoholics and drug dependent people???

  23. Faythe says

    This post is actually quite funny, on a not so funny subject. Anyway I will give my thoughts. I’m no medical professional, but have had life experiences and have do everything research for over 15 years with this subject. Okay so I’ll start by saying that yes all the scientific statements he talked about here are in fact true, already known for a long time about the neurotransmitters and cravings and how habits form. But he still did not prove to me that addiction is not a disease. Why, because doctors still can not figure out the exact science behind why some people become addicts? Secondly, if he does not believe it to be a disease then why did he refer to it as such multiple times in his rant? Also, just to point something out to the person above me who commented about fat people and cigarettes. I would also say those people are addicts too, food addicts and tobacco is a drug. These things are just more socially accepted and not stigmatized the way drug and alcohol addicts are. But people who can not quit smoking or can not control how much they eat are very much addicts with the disease of addiction in my eyes, probably many others who actually work in the field would agree with me on that. Anyway, another thing he says is ” It’s not like cancer, diabetes where you cannot exercise your constitutional freedom of choice” okay now I don’t think anyone has ever disagreed on the fact that the first time you drink or do drugs it is your choice. DUH! But nobody knows or thinks that when they drink alcohol or smoke pot for the first time that they will develop the disease of addiction, because if we knew that, there would probably be a lot less addicts because they wouldn’t pick up. And how about this doctor, if addiction is not a disease of the mind, then why are some people able to drink or take other substances recreationaly, while others slide down the slippery slope to full blown addiction?? And also if mental illness are so widely accepted as a disease why is it so hard to accept addiction as a disease?? They are all very similar. Chemical imbalances of the brain and disorders of our thoughts. Not every mental illness comes from birth. Many of them are brought out by situational events in a person’s life. Personality disorders are not chemical imbalances at all but learned behavior someone adapts to the way they were brought up. A personality disorder is just that a disorder of one’s personality usually brought on my childhood trauma and or some other situational events that make up that persons life in which they learn to think and behave a certain way. How is that so far off from addiction. Addiction is a disease of the mind, chemical imbalances and distorted thought processes brought on by a multitude of reasons that individually make up each addict. Biological, psychological, and social issues are usually affected in one form or another, different for each addict. But because there was a choice to try a drink one time usually as a young teenager and the decision making process is not at its best, people can not look past that to see that nobody chooses to become an addict. And when it comes to recovery, just stopping is not so simple, for many of the reasons stated above that the body craves the chemicals the brain is no longer making. Along with that comes major depression and anxiety. So even getting clean from the start is no simple task. But why don’t we ask ourselves about people who have substantial clean time under their belt, and then relapse. Those people know what addiction causes and also what it has done to their lives. But sometimes they still relapse. Yes ultimately they do have a choice to use or not to use. But maybe they have not done what is needed to cure the mind of the distorted thought process, and work on the way their body and mind react to emotions which then in turn creates negative behavior. Therefore their mind is still distorted in the decision making process. The disease is telling them irrational things in order to get them to use. And since they have not worked on their thought process they have no way of replacing the irrational with rational thoughts. Just as someone with depression, who does not get treatment can not rationally tell themselves that suicide is not the answer. I mean that is a really broad analogy but the two are similar in many ways. Its all a disease of the mind and thoughts that need to be treated in order to change. I’m sorry there is so much more I can say on this topic but I feel like I have already exhausted myself and whoever might be reading this and I’m losing my train of thought. I’m afraid some of this might already not make sense. I hope someone understands what I am trying to say here.

  24. Faythe says

    This post is actually quite funny, on a not so funny subject. Anyway I will give my thoughts. I’m no medical professional, but have had life experiences and have do everything research for over 15 years with this subject. Okay so I’ll start by saying that yes all the scientific statements he talked about here are in fact true, already known for a long time about the neurotransmitters and cravings and how habits form. But he still did not prove to me that addiction is not a disease. Why, because doctors still can not figure out the exact science behind why some people become addicts? Secondly, if he does not believe it to be a disease then why did he refer to it as such multiple times in his rant? Also, just to point something out to the person above me who commented about fat people and cigarettes. I would also say those people are addicts too, food addicts and tobacco is a drug. These things are just more socially accepted and not stigmatized the way drug and alcohol addicts are. But people who can not quit smoking or can not control how much they eat are very much addicts with the disease of addiction in my eyes, probably many others who actually work in the field would agree with me on that. Anyway, another thing he says is ” It’s not like cancer, diabetes where you cannot exercise your constitutional freedom of choice” okay now I don’t think anyone has ever disagreed on the fact that the first time you drink or do drugs it is your choice. DUH! But nobody knows or thinks that when they drink alcohol or smoke pot for the first time that they will develop the disease of addiction, because if we knew that, there would probably be a lot less addicts because they wouldn’t pick up. And how about this doctor, if addiction is not a disease of the mind, then why are some people able to drink or take other substances recreationaly, while others slide down the slippery slope to full blown addiction?? And also if mental illness are so widely accepted as a disease why is it so hard to accept addiction as a disease?? They are all very similar. Chemical imbalances of the brain and disorders of our thoughts. Not every mental illness comes from birth. Many of them are brought out by situational events in a person’s life. Personality disorders are not chemical imbalances at all but learned behavior someone adapts to the way they were brought up. A personality disorder is just that a disorder of one’s personality usually brought on my childhood trauma and or some other situational events that make up that persons life in which they learn to think and behave a certain way. How is that so far off from addiction. Addiction is a disease of the mind, chemical imbalances and distorted thought processes brought on by a multitude of reasons that individually make up each addict. Biological, psychological, and social issues are usually affected in one form or another, different for each addict. But because there was a choice to try a drink one time usually as a young teenager and the decision making process is not at its best, people can not look past that to see that nobody chooses to become an addict. And when it comes to recovery, just stopping is not so simple, for many of the reasons stated above that the body craves the chemicals the brain is no longer making. Along with that comes major depression and anxiety. So even getting clean from the start is no simple task. But why don’t we ask ourselves about people who have substantial clean time under their belt, and then relapse. Those people know what addiction causes and also what it has done to their lives. But sometimes they still relapse. Yes ultimately they do have a choice to use or not to use. But maybe they have not done what is needed to cure the mind of the distorted thought process, and work on the way their body and mind react to emotions which then in turn creates negative behavior. Therefore their mind is still distorted in the decision making process. The disease is telling them irrational things in order to get them to use. And since they have not worked on their thought process they have no way of replacing the irrational with rational thoughts. Just as someone with depression, who does not get treatment can not rationally tell themselves that suicide is not the answer. I mean that is a really broad analogy but the two are similar in many ways. Its all a disease of the mind and thoughts that need to be treated in order to change. I’m sorry there is so much more I can say on this topic but I feel like I have already exhausted myself and whoever might be reading this and I’m losing my train of thought. I’m afraid some of this might already not make sense. I hope someone understands what I am trying to say here.

  25. Tom says

    Diseases have two things in comment; symptoms and a course of treatment. With addiction to ingestive substances, those things we put in our bodies, the significant symptoms are the following: Tolerance–which I means i need more of the substance to achieve the desired affect; Withdrawal–symptoms vary but let’s use alcohol as the example. Cotton mouth, headache and delirium tremens are significant withdrawal symptoms, the latter being what is commonly referred to as the shakes and/or auditory, visual, or tactile hallucinations. Continued use despite negative consequences. These consequences of my use can run the gamut from being fired from jobs to incarceration, to the inability to sustain an interpersonal relationship. Repeated failed attempts to stop using the substance.The course of treatment is abstinence from use of the substance coupled with some form of sober support. This support could be a 12-step program, a spiritual group, a sober work crew, psychotherapy, a sober mentor, etc. The way members of our society stigmatize a person with an addiction and/or mental health diagnosis is criminal and is killing individuals and leading to heartbreak for families and other loved ones. A diabetic who misses several doctor appointments and shows up to tell her doctor that she has not been compliant with maintaining a healthy diet and optimum sugar levels would not be shamed by the doctor or other medical staff. She would not be told, “You are a bad person. Come back when it’s time to have your leg amputated.” Unfortunately there exists in our society a phrase I’ve coined–Asthetic Anxiety. Namely we don’t want to see the results of addiction and erroneously believe the proverbial “gutter drunk” or “junkie with a spike in his arm” is the face of addiction. Until we wake up as a society and find the type of money available to study and treat say cancer, we aren’t going to make the speedy inroads we need to educate, prevent and treat addiction. The next frontier will be treating individuals, many with double digits of sobriety, for sex and love addiction. Namaste and BE WELL! Tom Greaney, Westerly, RI. savvycomm10@yahoo.com

  26. Tom says

    Diseases have two things in comment; symptoms and a course of treatment. With addiction to ingestive substances, those things we put in our bodies, the significant symptoms are the following: Tolerance–which I means i need more of the substance to achieve the desired affect; Withdrawal–symptoms vary but let’s use alcohol as the example. Cotton mouth, headache and delirium tremens are significant withdrawal symptoms, the latter being what is commonly referred to as the shakes and/or auditory, visual, or tactile hallucinations. Continued use despite negative consequences. These consequences of my use can run the gamut from being fired from jobs to incarceration, to the inability to sustain an interpersonal relationship. Repeated failed attempts to stop using the substance.The course of treatment is abstinence from use of the substance coupled with some form of sober support. This support could be a 12-step program, a spiritual group, a sober work crew, psychotherapy, a sober mentor, etc. The way members of our society stigmatize a person with an addiction and/or mental health diagnosis is criminal and is killing individuals and leading to heartbreak for families and other loved ones. A diabetic who misses several doctor appointments and shows up to tell her doctor that she has not been compliant with maintaining a healthy diet and optimum sugar levels would not be shamed by the doctor or other medical staff. She would not be told, “You are a bad person. Come back when it’s time to have your leg amputated.” Unfortunately there exists in our society a phrase I’ve coined–Asthetic Anxiety. Namely we don’t want to see the results of addiction and erroneously believe the proverbial “gutter drunk” or “junkie with a spike in his arm” is the face of addiction. Until we wake up as a society and find the type of money available to study and treat say cancer, we aren’t going to make the speedy inroads we need to educate, prevent and treat addiction. The next frontier will be treating individuals, many with double digits of sobriety, for sex and love addiction. Namaste and BE WELL! Tom Greaney, Westerly, RI. savvycomm10@yahoo.com

  27. Annette says

    I totally agree with this man’s comments. I’ve been on both sides of addiction, begining with being a child of an acoholic and then I became a daily pot smoking codependent, which was directly related to my being one of the very first kids ever put on Ritalin back in the 60’s.
    I also married two alcoholics/daily pot smokers and I have siblings who have become alcoholics/drug users as well and married them as well.

    We choose to use or not use. I am a Christian and found most of my recovery through Celebrate Recovery and am currently battleing “emotional eating.” It is ALWAYS a choice! mAnd you don’t have to choose to stop alone, there are plenty of places, people, & groups to help the addict and the enabler.

  28. Annette says

    I totally agree with this man’s comments. I’ve been on both sides of addiction, begining with being a child of an acoholic and then I became a daily pot smoking codependent, which was directly related to my being one of the very first kids ever put on Ritalin back in the 60’s.
    I also married two alcoholics/daily pot smokers and I have siblings who have become alcoholics/drug users as well and married them as well.

    We choose to use or not use. I am a Christian and found most of my recovery through Celebrate Recovery and am currently battleing “emotional eating.” It is ALWAYS a choice! mAnd you don’t have to choose to stop alone, there are plenty of places, people, & groups to help the addict and the enabler.

  29. floyd says

    Well the best solution is often a short to the point one. I i think the doctor should grab a copy of the Big Book of Alcoholics Anomomous. He particularly needs to comprehend and choose to understand the phenomenon of craving,and individual either has this or they don’t, this determines whether one is an addict or not. So regardless on what a professional doctor, therapist or anyone determines, the fact is that the only one who can determine and know if they are an addict is the addict themselves.

  30. floyd says

    Well the best solution is often a short to the point one. I i think the doctor should grab a copy of the Big Book of Alcoholics Anomomous. He particularly needs to comprehend and choose to understand the phenomenon of craving,and individual either has this or they don’t, this determines whether one is an addict or not. So regardless on what a professional doctor, therapist or anyone determines, the fact is that the only one who can determine and know if they are an addict is the addict themselves.

  31. Ed says

    He missed that period between choice for pleasure to need for pleasure to need for survival until the cycle is broken and the individual can believe that a life can exist without alcohol and or drugs.

  32. Ed says

    He missed that period between choice for pleasure to need for pleasure to need for survival until the cycle is broken and the individual can believe that a life can exist without alcohol and or drugs.

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